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Nobody Likes An Energy Hog

No matter if you are in the dead of winter ice storms or the blistering days of summer, either one of them is just around the corner of your home owning experience. Consistently energy providers and energy conservationists tell us that heating and cooling our homes is the largest impact to our environment and our comfort. There is little doubt that just temperature control alone accounts for sixty percent of our home energy consumption.

Even as technology has advanced, if reductions continue to occur across the board, heating and cooling will still be the majority of our energy consumption. Slicing the pie doesnt change no matter if the size of the pie gets larger or smaller. We are creatures of comfort and we will always seek to make ourselves comfortable even as it costs us more and more.

The real question is how do we conserve energy. How do we assure ourselves that every watt used is not wasted? There are some simple tips that can answer the deeper question. By answer the deeper question we will certainly reduce energy consumption and increase both energy and money savings.

If youre not the home builder, then the original floor plan, type of windows and doors, careful sealing of entry ways for dirt, insects, and air, all of that is on the builder. But, since you are now the home owner, there are steps you havent taken that will make a difference. All of that is on you.

Trying to heat a home in the winter mean you have to be certain the ceilings, vents, doors and windows are not allowing the heated air to escape from the very top of things. As the internal heated air rises up, a disproportionate amount of it escapes right up through the leaking ceilings and attics.

Doing the opposite in the summer, our cooled air will drop to the floor and poorly caulked windows, doors, and walls will allow the cooled air to escape and warm air to penetrate. Homewindowsreplaced.com provides information on how to break this endless cycle of energy waste in all of our homes.

Heres a quick tip to check out the air leaks in your home. On the next windy day that comes your way, strike up a lighted incense stick with a favorable flavor and a smoky trail. Carry the stick to the most obvious air leak you think you have. Will it be the gap in the main doorway or its threshold at the floor? Maybe youll stand by that picture window in the living room or the side window in your bathroom that seems to bring a cool draft just as you are getting out of the shower. Dont forget to step by the fireplace or the backdoor. Just take a few minutes to scent your home and test your air leaks all at the same time. Ever seen smoke line up and blow sideways?

Seal those air leaks with caulk or putty or foam. Any manufacturer prints the proper use and instructions for application on their packaging. You can do this. You know where the leak is happening. You can seal it today and watch the next utility bill to see how it pays.

Seal and caulk those gaps wherein ducting, plumbing, or electrical wirings infiltrate into and then out of the home.

Look for gaps or holes under the insulation and seal them using the stapled plastic over those holes and then caulk them at once at the edges with plastics.

Set up rubber gaskets at the back of the outside switch plates and wall outlets.

When the fireplace is not at all used, always keep close the flue dumper.

Storm windows or double-pane windows must be installed as replacements for the single-pane windows ( homewindowsreplaced.com). The set of windows used in your homes can comprise as much as 10-25% of the heating bill. Securing them will likewise help you save up.

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